Utilities

FILE - In this July 8, 2014 file photo, a sign alerts visitors to water conservation efforts is displayed on a parched lawn at the state Capitol in Sacramento, Calif. Members of the state Water Resources Control Board delayed a decision about whether to bring back what had been temporary water bans from California's historic, five-year drought, Tuesday, Feb. 20, 2018. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
February 20, 2018 - 8:31 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — A proposal to make California's drought-era water restrictions permanent could allow the state to chip away at long-held water rights in an unprecedented power grab, representatives from water districts and other users told regulators Tuesday. Members of the state Water...
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February 12, 2018 - 3:06 am
IN THE NEWS: TECH ACADEMY AWARDS BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. (AP) — Patrick Stewart hosted the academy's annual Scientific and Technical Awards ceremony. He called the honorees "film magicians" and poked fun at his own lack of high-tech understanding. He said "I have to tell you, I wouldn't know the...
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FILE - In this July 25, 2012 file photo, California Gov. Jerry Brown prepares to announce plans to build a giant twin tunnel system to move water from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta to farmland and cities at a news conference in Sacramento. Brown is scaling back his troubled proposal for overhauling California's water system, at least for now. State official Karla Nemeth wrote Wednesday, Feb. 7, 2018, that the Brown administration is looking at building a single giant water tunnel now. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)
February 07, 2018 - 9:37 pm
SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Gov. Jerry Brown's administration scaled back the latest version of his four-decade effort to redo California's north-south water system Wednesday, cutting plans to build giant water tunnels from two to one. Reducing the number of tunnels — at least for now — would help...
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FILE - In this May 11, 2015, file photo, Colt Killian, left, and Rob Cox manipulate radioactive material remotely behind a protective barrier at the Hot Fuel Examination Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho. A federal judge says the U.S. Department of Energy doesn't need to make public documents involving spent commercial nuclear fuel shipments to eastern Idaho sought by former Idaho Gov. Cecil Andrus. (AP Photo/Keith Ridler, File)
February 07, 2018 - 6:40 pm
BOISE, Idaho (AP) — U.S. officials don't have to provide details about proposed shipments of extremely radioactive spent commercial nuclear fuel to the country's top government nuclear research laboratory in Idaho, a federal court has ruled. The ruling was a major setback to a lawsuit filed by...
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February 05, 2018 - 7:12 am
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — An appeal by the nation's largest public utility says a federal judge abused his discretion by ordering a massive coal ash cleanup at a Tennessee power plant. The Tennessee Valley Authority argues the Clean Water Act shouldn't have been applied in the case over the Gallatin...
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In this Jan. 30, 2018, photo, Environmental Protection Agency administrator Scott Pruitt testifies before the Senate Environment Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington. Newly released emails show Pruitt personally monitored efforts last year to excise much of the information about climate change from the agency’s website, especially President Obama’s signature effort to reduce planet-warming carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)
February 02, 2018 - 1:18 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Newly released emails show Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt personally monitored efforts last year to excise much of the information about climate change from the agency's website, especially President Obama's signature effort to reduce planet-warming...
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FILE- This April 20, 2011, file photo shows some of the 30,000 solar panels that make up the Public Service Company of New Mexico's new 2-megawatt photovoltaic array in Albuquerque, N.M. Some in the U.S. solar-power industry are hoping a decision this week by President Donald Trump doesn’t bring on an eclipse. Companies that install solar-power systems for homeowners and utilities are bracing for Trump’s call on whether to slap tariffs on imported panels. The solar business in the U.S. has boomed in recent years, driven by falling prices for panels, thanks in part to cheap imports. That has made solar power more competitive with electricity generated from coal and natural gas. (AP Photo/Susan Montoya Bryan,File)
January 23, 2018 - 1:39 am
DALLAS (AP) — Solar energy is booming in the United States, but companies riding the wave fear that President Donald Trump could undercut them this week if he decides to impose new tariffs on imported solar panels. Businesses that install solar-power systems are benefiting from a glut of cheaper...
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A photo taken by a robotic probe provided by the International Research Institute for Nuclear Decommissioning, Friday, Jan. 19, 2018, shows a part of what is believed to be the handle of the fuel rods container and melted fuel in small lumps scattered on a structure below the Fukushima reactor core. The operator of the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant says a long telescopic pipe carrying a camera has captured images of some melted fuel inside one of the three reactors, a crucial information for the decades-long cleanup. (International Research Institute for Nuclear Decommissioning via AP)
January 19, 2018 - 10:08 am
TOKYO (AP) — The operator of Japan's crippled Fukushima nuclear plant said Friday that a long telescopic probe successfully captured images of what is most likely melted fuel inside one of its three damaged reactors, providing limited but crucial information for its cleanup. Tokyo Electric Power Co...
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January 16, 2018 - 10:15 pm
(The Conversation is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.) Tom Vilsack, Colorado State University (THE CONVERSATION) Since the turn of the year, Congress and the Trump administration have been haggling over legislative priorities for 2018. Many...
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FILE - In this Aug. 20, 2007 file photo, Robert "Bob" Murray, founder and chairman of Cleveland-based Murray Energy Corp., arrives at a news conference at the entrance to the Crandall Canyon Mine, in northwest of Huntington, Utah. In the early days of the Trump administration, Murray, the head of one of America’s largest coal companies sent a four-page “action plan” to the White House calling for rollbacks of key environmental and mine safety regulations he claimed would help revive the struggling mining industry. A review by The Associated Press of that March 1, 2017, plan shows Murray, an early Trump campaign supporter, has gotten about half the items on his wish list. Still others, such as eliminating federal tax credits for wind turbines and solar panels, failed to win approval in Congress. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong, File)
January 10, 2018 - 5:51 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — In the early days of the Trump administration, the head of one of America's largest coal companies sent a four-page "action plan" to the White House calling for rollbacks of Obama-era environmental and mine safety regulations. "We have listed our suggested actions in order of...
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