Trees

FILE - In this April 23, 2013 photo, a man works to cut down the poisoned oak trees at Toomer's Corner at the entrance to Auburn University in Auburn, Ala. University of Alabama fan Harvey Updyke Jr. pleaded guilty to placing herbicide on the trees and was ordered to pay about $800,000 in restitution. He is due in court on Oct. 30, 2019, to explain why the money is not being paid. (AP Photo/Dave Martin)
August 15, 2019 - 11:44 am
AUBURN, Ala. (AP) — A prosecutor wants to know why a University of Alabama fan who pleaded guilty to poisoning landmark oak trees at Auburn University isn't making court-ordered restitution payments. Harvey Updyke was ordered to appear in court Oct. 30 to explain himself, Lee County District...
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ADDS UPDATE OF NASHVILLE CITY DECISION ON TREES - Pedestrians make their way through a row of Cherry trees at Riverfront Park along First Ave. North in Nashville, Tenn., Saturday, March 30, 2019. Nashville was planning to cut down 21 cherry trees to make space for an NFL draft stage, but later Saturday, Nashville Mayor David Briley said the city won't cut down the trees. (George Walker IV/The Tennessean via AP)
April 01, 2019 - 10:14 am
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The leader of a Nashville organizing group for this month's NFL draft has apologized about initial plans to cut 21 ornamental cherry trees to make room for the event, which caused an uproar before it was modified. Nashville Convention and Visitors Corp. CEO Butch Spyridon...
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ADDS UPDATE OF NASHVILLE CITY DECISION ON TREES - Pedestrians make their way through a row of Cherry trees at Riverfront Park along First Ave. North in Nashville, Tenn., Saturday, March 30, 2019. Nashville was planning to cut down 21 cherry trees to make space for an NFL draft stage, but later Saturday, Nashville Mayor David Briley said the city won't cut down the trees. (George Walker IV/The Tennessean via AP)
March 30, 2019 - 8:04 pm
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The city of Nashville won't cut down 21 ornamental cherry trees to make space for an NFL draft stage, Mayor David Briley said Saturday. In a news release, Briley said he had informed the NFL and Nashville Convention and Visitors Corp. that they will have to remove the trees...
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Justin Rose, of England, celebrates his win on the 18th green of the South Course at Torrey Pines golf course after winning the Farmers Insurance golf tournament Sunday, Jan. 27, 2019, in San Diego. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)
January 27, 2019 - 6:44 pm
SAN DIEGO (AP) — Justin Rose overcame a few nervous moments early with enough key putts down the stretch for a 3-under 69 and a two-stroke victory over Adam Scott in the Farmers Insurance Open on Sunday. Rose had a three-shot lead shrink to a single shot with his third bogey in five holes to start...
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March 30, 2018 - 5:01 pm
AUGUSTA, Ga. (AP) — A hole-by-hole look at Augusta National, site of the 82nd Masters to be played April 5-8, with famous shots played at each one, the average score and where each hole ranks in difficulty since 1934: No. 1, 445 yards, par 4 (Tea Olive): This slight dogleg right plays uphill and...
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FILE - In this Friday, Jan. 22, 2016, file photo, gondolas make their way through a thinned forest up the ski slope which would be the venue for the Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympics at the Jeongseon Alpine Center in Jeongseon, South Korea. With the Olympic Games coming to a close, one of the main questions facing South Korea and the consequences of hosting an expensive sports event is the future of the scenic Jeongseon Alpine Center, which was built in a formerly government-protected area where some 60,000 trees were razed. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)
March 01, 2018 - 8:23 pm
JEONGSEON, South Korea (AP) — As hundreds of Olympic spectators flocked to a sparkling white ski slope cutting through the rugged mountains of Jeongseon, the marquee venue of this year's Winter Games, Cho Myung-hwan stepped back and looked up. He let out a sad chuckle. "It's dreadful to watch," Cho...
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In a Sept. 15, 2016 photo provided by the University of Maine, Gaetan Pelletier of the Northern Hardwoods Research Institute describes diseased beech problem to members of the University of Maine Cooperative Forestry Research Unit in a stand of diseased beech in Aroostook, County. The tell-tale signs of beech bark disease are seen in the pock marked bark in this photo. Scientists say beech trees are beginning to dominate Northeastern forests in the era of climate change, and they are susceptible to diseases. (Brian E. Roth/University of Maine via AP)
February 25, 2018 - 12:04 pm
PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Beech trees are dominating the woodlands of the northeastern United States as the climate changes, and that could be bad news for the forests and people who work in them, according to a group of scientists. The scientists say the move toward beech-heavy forests is associated...
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February 21, 2018 - 4:18 pm
RENO, Nev. (AP) — A Lake Tahoe ski resort is developing a plan to improve skiing during low-snow seasons by removing boulders and trees from several runs. Heavenly Mountain Resort's plan calls for widening a dozen trails and removing potentially hundreds or even thousands of trees. The hope is to...
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December 24, 2017 - 5:22 am
HOEDSPRUIT, South Africa (AP) — The humble bee is helping to keep elephants from destroying trees and wiping out crops in their quest for food. A project launched near South Africa's Kruger National Park in 2015 has found success. An elephant's skin is thick but sensitive. The animals will try to...
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This Aug. 1, 2017 photo shows Llewellyn Everage, who directs interns and volunteers at the Audubon Louisiana Nature Center, gesturing towards an area of the nature center that had been cleared of tallow using heavy machinery, with tallows yet to be cleared in the background, at the center in New Orleans. The tallow is a highly invasive tree rapidly overtaking forests from Texas to Florida. The 86-acre site, with walking trails and boardwalks winding through a swampy forest, flooded in 2005 and became overrun with Chinese tallow in the years that followed. (AP Photo/Stacey Plaisance)
November 14, 2017 - 4:04 am
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — The tallow tree, a "super invader" with toxic leaves and no natural enemies in North America, is conquering the South. Overtaking forests from Texas to Florida, tallows grow three times faster than most native hardwoods, and each one casts off 100,000 seeds a year. Controlled...
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