Sexual orientation discrimination

With members of the U.S. women's soccer team in the background before the start of a ticker tape parade in their honor, Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks before signing a bill into law Wednesday, July 10, 2019, in New York. The bill will expand a law banning gender pay discrimination to make it illegal for employers to pay workers differently based on their age, race, religion or other characteristics, and making it easier for workers to prove pay discrimination in court. (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)
July 10, 2019 - 3:38 pm
ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — New York state expanded a state law Wednesday that prohibits gender pay discrimination, making it illegal to pay someone less based on characteristics including race, religion, disability or gender identity. Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed the changes into law in Manhattan,...
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FILE - This Oct. 4, 2018, file photo shows the U.S. Supreme Court at sunset in Washington. More than 200 corporations have signed a friend-of-the-court brief urging the U.S. Supreme Court to rule that federal civil rights law bans job discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity. The brief, announced Tuesday, July 2, 2019 by a coalition of five LGBTQ-rights groups, is being submitted to the Supreme Court this week ahead of oral arguments before the justices this fall on three cases that may determine whether gays, lesbians and transgender people are protected from discrimination by existing federal civil rights laws. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)
July 02, 2019 - 12:46 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — More than 200 corporations, including many of America's best-known companies, are urging the U.S. Supreme Court to rule that federal civil rights law bans job discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity. The corporations outlined their stance in a legal...
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FILE - This Oct. 4, 2018, file photo shows the U.S. Supreme Court at sunset in Washington. More than 200 corporations have signed a friend-of-the-court brief urging the U.S. Supreme Court to rule that federal civil rights law bans job discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity. The brief, announced Tuesday, July 2, 2019 by a coalition of five LGBTQ-rights groups, is being submitted to the Supreme Court this week ahead of oral arguments before the justices this fall on three cases that may determine whether gays, lesbians and transgender people are protected from discrimination by existing federal civil rights laws. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)
July 02, 2019 - 9:48 am
NEW YORK (AP) — More than 200 corporations have signed a friend-of-the-court brief urging the U.S. Supreme Court to rule that federal civil rights law bans job discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity. The brief was announced Tuesday by a coalition of five LGBTQ rights...
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FILE - In this Feb. 7, 2019 file photo, Bloomfield High School transgender athlete Terry Miller, second from left, wins the final of the 55-meter dash over transgender athlete Andraya Yearwood, far left, and other runners in the Connecticut girls Class S indoor track meet at Hillhouse High School in New Haven, Conn. Three Connecticut girls who participate on high school track teams have filed a federal discrimination complaint against a statewide policy on transgender athletes, saying it has cost them top finishes in competitions and possibly college scholarships. (AP Photo/Pat Eaton-Robb, File)
June 18, 2019 - 5:34 pm
HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Three Connecticut girls who have run high school track have filed a federal discrimination complaint saying a statewide policy on transgender athletes has cost them top finishes in races and possibly college scholarships. The complaint filed Monday with the U.S. Education...
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FILE - In this Sept. 13, 2014, photo a view of rainbow laces in Tottenham Hotspurs' Harry Kane boots, as part of an anti-homophobia campaign, as he warms up ahead of their English Premier League soccer match against Sunderland at the Stadium of Light, Sunderland, England. The French football league has set up an action plan to tackle homophobia in its stadiums that paves the way for judicial sanctions against abusive fans. (AP Photo/Scott Heppell)
May 13, 2019 - 7:51 am
PARIS (AP) — The French soccer league has set up an action plan to tackle homophobia in its stadiums, a system that will pave the way for judicial sanctions against abusive fans. Often heard at French league matches, homophobic chants have been tolerated for a long time by many club officials, and...
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In this picture taken Sunday, June 24, 2018, Andrei, who uses the stage name Star Vasha applies make up on before performing at a Gay club during the 2018 soccer World Cup in Yekaterinburg, Russia. The World Cup is making Russia look almost gay-friendly. Russia normally outlaws gay "propaganda" to minors and hanging a rainbow flag can lead to arrest. But the international scrutiny that comes with hosting the World Cup has forced Russian authorities to be nicer to LGBT activists. Activists hope this shift lasts beyond the tournament, and that the World Cup will leave a changed nation in its wake. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda)
June 29, 2018 - 7:20 am
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia (AP) — While World Cup fans pack the St. Petersburg Stadium fantasizing of soccer victory, Pyotr Voskresensky and fellow gay rights activists follow the matches in a quiet gallery across town decorated with beanbags and astroturf. They relish a different dream. Voskresensky,...
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FILE - In this file photo taken on Tuesday, May 1, 2018, gay rights activist attend a May Day rally in St.Petersburg, Russia. Tolerated during the World Cup, Russia’s LGBT communities face a return to widespread discrimination when the FIFA circus packs up and leaves the country in mid-July. As head of Russia’s LGBT Sports Federation, Alexander Agapov says he can’t advertise sports events without hiring security and he’s been attacked on public transport. Still, he predicts foreigners arriving for the World Cup won’t notice a thing.(AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky, File)
June 01, 2018 - 11:12 am
MOSCOW (AP) — Tolerated during the World Cup, Russia's LGBT communities face a return to widespread discrimination when the FIFA circus packs up and leaves the country in mid-July. As head of Russia's LGBT Sports Federation, Alexander Agapov says he can't advertise sports events without hiring...
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FILE - In this Saturday, April 28, 2012 file photo, Zenit's fans march prior to their national soccer Championship in downtown St.Petersburg, Russia. Racist and anti-gay chants have become more common in Russian soccer as the country prepares to host the World Cup, even as overall incidents of discrimination declined. (AP Photo/Dmitry Lovetsky, File)
May 30, 2018 - 8:44 am
MOSCOW (AP) — Racist and anti-gay chants have become more common in Russian soccer as the country prepares to host the World Cup, even as overall incidents of discrimination declined. Nineteen incidents of abusive chants were recorded this season, according to an annual report from the anti-...
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FILE - In this Saturday, Nov. 5, 2016 file photo, people gather in the landmark Jemaa el-Fnaa square, in Marrakesh, Morocco. A FIFA task force arrived in Morocco on Monday, April 16, 2018 to inspect a World Cup bid that obscures one potential impediment to hosting the 2026 soccer showpiece: homosexuality is a criminal offense in the north African country. An Associated Press review of 483 pages of documents submitted to FIFA found Morocco failed to declare its anti-LGBT law as a risk factor and provide a remedy, appearing to flout stringent new bidding requirements.(AP Photo/Mosa'ab Elshamy, file)
April 16, 2018 - 7:44 pm
A FIFA task force arrived in Morocco on Monday to inspect a World Cup bid that obscures one potential impediment to hosting the 2026 soccer showpiece: Homosexuality is a criminal offense in the north African country. An Associated Press review of 483 pages of documents submitted to FIFA found...
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FILE - In this March 31, 2015, file photo, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence takes a question during a news conference discussing the state's new religious-freedom law in Indianapolis. Then-Indiana Gov. Mike Pence faced a firestorm of criticism three years ago after signing a "religious freedom" law critics decried as anti-gay. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings, File)
March 28, 2018 - 5:46 pm
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Then-Indiana Gov. Mike Pence faced a firestorm of criticism three years ago after signing a "religious freedom" law critics decried as anti-gay. Now emails released this week to The Associated Press illustrate similar backlash from fellow conservatives when the eventual vice...
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